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Why Alibaba is betting big on AI chips and quantum computing

MIT Top Stories - 6 hours 5 min ago
Meet the man behind Alibaba’s gamble on emerging tech.

Twitter says private messages may have been breached

IT Portal from UK - 7 hours 35 min ago

Twitter has informed an undisclosed number of users that their private messages could have possibly been exposed to third-parties for more than a year.

This could certainly hurt the social network's attempts at monetisation as the direct messages that were exposed were between users and businesses that offer customer services via the platform. However, the software 'bug' has since been fixed.

Twitter is notifying affected users by a message that appears when they open its app or log on to its website. The company has revealed that the issue has persisted since May of 2017 and that it resolved the issue immediately after discovering it.

Twitter has not said exactly how many users it has notified regarding the issue but the company did reveal that fewer than one per cent of its total users were affected.

The social network made it clear that not all direct messages were at risk but rather just those between users and companies such as airlines that have begun to use the service to offer customer support to their users.

While revealing that some of the direct messages sent on its platform have been exposed could hurt Twitter's business in the short run, if more users are affected by this issue then the company has shown that it is ahead of the issue and has addressed it accordingly.

Until we know exactly how many users have been affected, it is probably best to wait to contact businesses directly using Twitter.

Image Credit: freestocks.org / Pexels

How to choose the best enterprise storage solution for your business

IT Portal from UK - 8 hours 5 min ago

Data is the lifeblood of any business, so it’s important to consider how and where you will store it. Your individual business and specific data requirements will drive what choice you make. There are a number of considerations and questions you should ask yourself as a business before making any decisions on storage solutions. 

What does your current environment look like? 

What are the challenges in managing your environment? How do these challenges affect your business? What applications do you use? What is your software stack? What are your operating systems and software packages? 

Do you have specific requirements from a new storage solution? 

Do you want to improve performance, resilience, capacity? Have you considered other features like encryption? Is a single or multisite storage solution required? Do you want or intend to manage your own infrastructure, or would you consider a managed service?  Have you considered a full or partial cloud-based solution or does your business need to contain full security control through an on-premise infrastructure solution? 

Have you fully considered how you will protect your data?  

The demands for data storage and its retrieval rise daily as does the ingenuity of cyber-attacks and ransomware.  What plans have you in place for your Data Back-up and Disaster Recovery in the event of an attack and ultimately for Business Continuity? Is 

How will you migrate to your new system? 

How much data needs to be migrated? What type of data is it? What migration tools will you use? What is the timeframe for completion of migration? Who has responsibility for migration? Do you need to migrate all your data? 

What is your budget? 

Capital expenditure or Operational expenditure through a consumption-based payment structure? 

What is your time frame? 

Looking ahead, what length of support do you need? Three years, five years, more or less? And critically, how is your new enterprise storage system expected to grow and scale over time? What the objectives might there be over a three to five year period? How might your objectives change over time and how might your data solution need to adapt too?

New technology equals new solutions

As well as multiple things to consider, and an infinite number of individual needs, there are also now an ever increasing number of new technologies changing the way organisations can approach data storage. It’s no surprise that business can get confused and overwhelmed when it comes to planning the best solution for them. Broadly speaking the main options fall into a number of categories. 

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) 

IT service providers are expanding the number of ‘as a service’ offerings and it’s now commonplace for organisations to spread some IT costs via monthly subscriptions. This enables organisations to scale up and down within a business landscape that is ever-changing. Flexible capacity storage options such as IaaS and SaaS are enabling organisations to move away from capex investment to models whereby they pay for the storage consumed on a monthly, quarterly or annual basis. Businesses can also adopt pay per use data storage models using hardware located on their own site, with options to buy at the end of the arrangement. 

Hybrid solutions 

Hybrid solutions are an increasingly popular option which combine the flexibility of private or public cloud storage for less sensitive data with the security of on-site storage for business-critical and/or sensitive data. 

Tiered storage solutions 

Similarly, organisations are implementing tiered storage – whereby different categories of data are assigned to various types of storage media – as a means of adopting the most appropriate technology to suit the data being stored and to reduce total storage cost. Flash storage technology is evolving and it is likely that Flash memory will be utilised to boost system performance. As costs continue to fall, we expect to see more data transferred to fast reliable Flash storage.  

In-built storage 

A counter to this is the emergence of in-built storage. Many customers are opting for storage built directly into their hardware infrastructure, thereby removing the need for separate storage devices.

Software Defined Storage (SDS) 

In addition to investing in new data storage infrastructure, Software Defined Storage (SDS) allows organisations to become more agile in how they take advantage of virtualisation without requiring the purchase of new hardware. It enables the use of multiple types of storage hardware to provide a simple to use platform which can easily be upgraded. This can be an ideal solution for organisations looking to integrate existing IT equipment with new storage capacity. The advent and maturity of SDS and widespread use of hypervisors means it’s easier to mix storage/ servers and network vendors, giving buyers greater flexibility to suit their individual data storage needs than ever before and the ability to shop around.

Critical considerations

Too often, we meet customers who simply haven’t engaged early enough for the plan they have in place. For big organisations, storage projects can take months, even years to complete, so it’s crucial you engage early. We also face issues with limited capacity, where the project hasn’t been planned correctly so halfway through, our IT teams find they are running out of capacity. This can grind projects to a halt. Ensure everything is pre-planned and in place before embarking on a new project.

Another common pitfall for organisations is that they misjudge the amount of data storage they will actually require – it is hard to plan what the business is going to need for the next four to seven years (a typical storage investment cycle). 

The data landscape is constantly evolving, creating demand for new better storage solutions that cater for the huge variety of business needs. Businesses must properly consider their needs, plan accordingly and seek expert help and guidance when they need to implement the best system for them, both now, and in the future.

Paul Timms, Managing Director at MCSA 

Image Credit: Scanrail1 / Shutterstock

Microsoft wants to put Cortana in your business apps

IT Portal from UK - 8 hours 24 min ago

During the company's recent Ignite conference in Orlando, Microsoft revealed that it is bringing Cortana to the office in a big way with its new Cortana Skills Kit for Enterprise platform.

The new development platform is currently available by invitation only but once it becomes generally available, organisations will be able to build Cortana functionality right into their business apps which will allow employees to interact with their devices and software using only their voice.

Microsoft Corporate Vice President in charge of Cortana, Javier Soltero explained why the company chose to give businesses access to its virtual assistant Cortana, saying:

“At heart, we are about providing valuable assistance to users throughout their day. That assistance takes different forms depending on where the users are in their day and what they are trying to do. It’s important for enterprises to be able to enable their workforces to use Cortana to perform company-specific tasks.” 

The Cortana Skills Kit for Enterprise is powered by Microsoft's Azure Bot Service and the new development platform leverages Language Understanding from Azure Cognitive Services. This allows developers to create company-specific skills for Cortana using known and trusted tools. Company admins can also control when skills are deployed and who can access them using Azure Active Directory.

While we do not yet know what skills businesses will create for the platform, IT developers at Microsoft created an IT help desk skill as a proof of concept that enables Cortana to file tickets for employees experiencing computer issues and connect them to someone who can help.

Businesses interested in creating their own Cortana skills can request an invitation from Microsoft to try out the new development platform ahead of its official release.

Image Credit: StockStudio / Shutterstock

The case for blockchain in law and the courts’

IT Portal from UK - 9 hours 2 min ago

When cryptocurrencies first emerged, supported by the public transaction ledger called blockchain, many commentators felt it might actually be the invention of the latter that would inspire the real change in other sectors. It’s now looks like law could be one such sector.

The main reason for this lies in the potential blockchain has to transform the level of security that is used to protect evidence during the process of a trial. This is more vital than ever as the UK courts are currently undergoing a £1.2bn modernisation programme, that includes the digitisation of many processes to improve efficiency.

These will likely lead in the long term to the elimination of paper in the trial environment, as the often-painstaking process of using paper bundles continues to be digitised and the information more easily accessed, both in and outside of the court. These systems are already in use in many of the UK’s Crown and Family courts, as well as various international arbitration courts such as the UAE.  

While modernising the system is advantageous from a cost, effort and time perspective, using technology always carries new and unique risks. One such difference between physical paper evidence and digital evidence for example is that digital evidence can be modified.

In many ways security concerns such as these have played their role in the legal sectors conservative take up of new technology. The viruses and bugs prevalent in the early internet era existed because tech companies prioritised bottom line profits over safety. Similar oversight in the justice system could have an unwanted impact on trial outcomes in a system where trust is paramount.

This is why the emergence of Blockchain is particularly significant. The way Blockchain collects data means it does so on every transaction that occurs in the storage of an item, providing a full audit trail of action. As such, once a piece of evidence has been entered into the online system it cannot be altered or falsified. This is down to a unique combination of cryptography, which renders the data that is stored immutable and then its openness, which is how it is distributed among a peer-to-peer set of participants.

Thinking of security

Crucially, whilst blockchain is a public artefact, inspection of blockchain doesn’t reveal evidence, only IDs and hash codes, creating an incorruptible digital ledger. This eliminates the possibility that evidential material submitted to court can be repudiated, removing any questions of legitimacy from the trial process as it is not possible to photo-shop a picture or splice a video.

With blockchain supporting digital systems such as e-bundles all parties involved in a trial can take confidence that they all have access to the same version of documents and evidence, without any concerns over the security of the data involved. This is not always possible when each party has ten lever arch files, all of which need to be updated and handled individually.

The move to e-bundles will also work to speak to wider environmental concerns sparked by the legal sector. The courts are said to produce a pile of paper the size of the shard every four days. Modernisation is badly needed.

Furthermore, paper has become burdensome to the courts as it is expensive throughout its life cycle and has an unsustainable ever-growing cost that is adding up for local governments. While the initial purchase price of a piece of paper is well below 1p, once other factors are taken into consideration such as storage and transport, it can end up costing as much as 25p per page.

Citizens depend on local governments to provide a diverse array of legal services, but they are under pressure from rising case demands and diminishing budgets from austerity. Cost effective technology has therefore become increasingly necessary.

Another factor to contend with is that local governments must comply with strict data protection laws to avoid unintentional disclosure that has significant human and financial costs. Security is often one reason the legal sector must be more conservative in its approach to innovation, given how important trust is in the system.

What can blockchain provide?

It has therefore been at the centre of the systems being introduced to ensure secure, dependable justice. This means full disclosure and a full audit trail of action combined with a secure cloud-based platform for the sharing of sensitive data. It’s essential in supporting the systems that provide protection for potentially life-changing data and evidence.

Take the case of Lorraine v Markel American Insurance Co. In this case the judge ruled that neither party had provided admissible evidence and went on to give guidance on the admissibility of Electronically Stored Information (ESI). Amongst the judge’s five separate points he said that one must be able to prove that the ESI present is indeed what one claims it to be, going on to describe methods for authenticating evidence which include hash values and meta-data analysis.

In his fourth rule, he said that the evidence provided should either be original or an admissible duplicate. With courts demanding a high bar for the admissibility of electronic evidence, blockchain technology presents a solution to confirming the originality of evidence used, whilst also helping to mitigate against the human element risk associated with all electronic data systems.

So clearly courts will be demanding a high bar for the admissibility of electronic evidence. The solution to this therefore requires that there can be no doubt about whether evidence presented in the court room is what was originally submitted to the electronic evidence bundle.

Therefore, evidence management systems that do more than simply provide the original electronic file in the court room will need to answer the simple question: Am I looking at something that is irrefutably the same as the original electronic evidence loaded into this system?

Blockchain can provide this.

It can also provide a platform for further innovation in the legal sector going forward. With security guaranteed, the global legal sector can then continue to confidently pursue innovation and embrace the new digital age.  

Paul Sachs, founder and CTO, CaseLines
Image Credit: Zapp2Photo / Shutterstock

Employing machine learning in a security environment

IT Portal from UK - 9 hours 5 min ago

No matter where you look in the security world today, you’ll see the terms machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI). There’s been a great deal of interest in these technologies as organisations look for better ways to improve their security posture and fight against advancing cyberattacks. Both machine learning and AI are offering breakthroughs in solving problems in many other areas of our lives, so it’s only natural to try to use them to make similar breakthroughs in the field of security. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of hype and misinformation surrounding what machine learning and AI can do to improve security. 

Machine learning has been around for decades, but until recently, it wasn’t feasible for most organisations for two reasons. Firstly, machine learning needs an incredible amount of computational power in order to apply its algorithms to data and get reliable results quickly. Secondly, machine learning requires vast stores of data to mine. As the cost of storage has gone down, however, it has become increasingly accessible for data storage needs (e.g., building repositories such as data warehouses or data lakes). Processing power continues to nearly double each year. These advances in technology have come together to make machine learning practical and accessible. 

The need for automation

Machine learning and AI have subsequently become frequent buzzwords in the security space. Security teams have an urgent need for more automated methods for detecting threats and malicious user behaviour—and this need is driving increased interest in these topics. Automation is vital for overwhelmed security teams. This is because prevention measures are not infallible, and many of today’s detection methods rely on manual investigation and decision making to find advanced threats, malicious user behaviour, and other serious issues. 

Security analysts encounter huge numbers of false positives and negatives. Indeed, the threat surface has increased exponentially due to the expansion of mobile devices, cloud storage, and the Internet of Things—all of which only increase the number of false positives. Security teams are buried in alarm fatigue. They can’t keep up with the activity that needs to be analysed, or they struggle to identify emerging threats in order to focus the real threats.

Improving detection means improving accuracy and efficiency, and that requires figuring out how to make detection technologies smarter. That’s where AI and machine learning come in. Machine learning offers far better capabilities than humans can deliver in recognising and predicting certain types of patterns. Security technologies can use machine learning to identify patterns in their data, enabling them to make decisions and to help humans make decisions faster and more accurately. With machine learning, security technologies can also move beyond rules-based approaches that require prior knowledge of known patterns. For example, it can learn the typical patterns of activity within a networking environment to recognise pattern deviations. These departures are possibly indicative of threats and identify these threats earlier in the Cyber Attack Lifecycle. 

It's worth noting though that the effectiveness of machine learning relies on having access to large sets of high-quality, rich, structured data capturing network activities across numerous endpoints. The old phrase “garbage in/garbage out” perfectly explains this situation. If machine learning algorithms ingest data sets that aren’t accurate, clear, well-organised, and comprehensive, they’re not going to produce the desired results. In other words, just because there are machine learning algorithms in place doesn’t necessarily mean what they learn is intelligent and useful. If you teach the algorithms the wrong lessons, they’re going to deliver the wrong answers.

The hype and the reality

In a perfect world, machine learning would be the silver bullet for defeating your organisation’s security challenges It would enable full automation of security operations, eliminating the need for human involvement. It would learn what every user, system, and application does in incredible detail, enabling immediate identification and handling of user impersonation, malicious intent, and other issues. However, this isn’t realistic.  

Applying AI to security via machine learning is frequently presented as an easy solution. It’s not. Contrary to many claims, no product can deliver a silver bullet for this today. It will take considerable time and advancement to achieve this effectively. Consider the similarities between a Security Operations Centre (SOC) that identifies and responds to security incidents and a fraud department that uses fraud analytics techniques to identify and respond to credit card misuse. Even though analysis and identification may be automated, humans are still needed to respond and recover (e.g., deciding an issue is a false positive, communicating with the affected people, and coordinating actions with other organisations). Today’s security products cannot fully automate the SOC and completely eliminate the need for security analysts, incident responders, and other SOC staff. 

While it is not a silver bullet, there is a tremendous amount of value in applying machine learning to solving security challenges. Achieving AI would significantly reduce the mundane work performed by highly skilled and highly paid people. It would also make incident response much faster, effective, efficient, and accurate. However, instead of striving for the unrealistic goal of having AI today, we need to make incremental progress. For instance, applying machine learning pattern recognition to automatically link a threat model from six weeks ago to a similar one today is a realistic goal. 

Today, machine learning is most helpful in threat detection by learning the patterns of normal activities and recognising anomalies: the introduction or prediction of a new pattern, a change in an existing pattern, or the removal of a pattern. Given the sheer volume of activities occurring in today’s systems and applications, machine learning’s pattern recognition and predictive capabilities have become incredibly important. 

There is a shortcoming to machine learning, however. Alone, it lacks the understanding of security context to recognise the importance or unimportance of each anomaly. Machine learning can identify that a user is acting in an atypical manner, but atypical behaviour is not necessarily good or bad. For example, a user connecting to a server for the first time might be an anomaly, but is it a malicious act? 

In business analytics and other fields, machine learning works well on its own because it looks at anomaly-free data and needs no additional context to predict trends. In the security field, there are many benign anomalies, so the ability to identify anomalies, while important, can’t possibly provide the whole explanation of what’s happened and enable accurate predictions of what will happen. It’s best to think of machine learning’s anomaly recognition capabilities as one of the tools in your toolbox. Imagine that 80–85 percent of threats are known or recognisable by your security information and event management (SIEM) platform. If this is true, 15–20 percent of threats are unknown, and therefore unrecognisable, by your SIEM. This is where machine learning comes in. You need the right tool for the right job, and this is Next Generation SIEM. 

To effectively detect threats, you need to employ the correct algorithm for that threat type. The rest of your tools provide the security context and relevancy. A NextGen SIEM solution can integrate and correlate information from many tools, such as human resources (HR) systems, identity management solutions, vulnerability scanners, and asset management systems. When used together, machine learning and the other tools generate the risk information needed to prioritise human actions. Without prioritisation, there are so many anomalies that it’s impossible to examine them all and find the truly important ones.

Applying machine learning to User and Entity Behaviour Analytics

Threat prediction and detection is a critical area of security that can benefit from machine learning. Consider the challenges in performing user and entity behaviour analytics (UEBA). Gartner defines UEBA as “profiling and anomaly detection based on a range of analytics approaches, usually using a combination of basic analytics methods (e.g., rules that leverage signatures, pattern matching and simple statistics) and advanced analytics (e.g., supervised and unsupervised machine learning”.

UEBA is a perfect application for machine learning as long as the necessary security context is available for understanding the significance of each anomaly. Machine learning can make UEBA considerably more effective for the following reasons: 

  • It can handle the volumes of data to be analysed and the environment to be understood. This includes being able to incorporate many types of data sets, from network traffic patterns and application data to records of user authentication attempts and user access to sensitive data
  • Machine learning-driven UEBA is well suited for identifying “qualified” threats—those that are legitimate and require action. It can take many more factors into consideration than humans can when looking at potential threats, and it can do so in near real time
  • Machine learning-driven UEBA can identify the threats that are hardest to find, such as insider threats, privileged account takeovers, and unknown threats by recognising shifts in behaviour. An organisation can use machine learning to dynamically identify asset risks
  • It can leverage that risk information to identify new activity that conflicts with expected patterns, such as a low-risk user suddenly connecting to a high-risk system and transferring large amounts of data from it to a laptop

Machine learning offers a great deal of promise in improving security by greatly reducing human effort and lowering the time to detect, respond to, and recover from incidents. When used effectively, machine learning can help organisations detect hidden threats and minimise false positives, accelerate incident response, streamline SOC operations to reduce mean time to detect and respond to threats. The technology essentially enables security teams and technology to be better, smarter, and faster by having advanced analytics at the fingertips to solve real problems—like detecting user-based threats such as UEBA—quickly.

Ross Brewer, Vice President and Managing Director of EMEA at LogRhythm

Image Credit: Geralt / Pixabay

Successful automation starts with a transformation approach

IT Portal from UK - 9 hours 35 min ago

Automation is in the news everywhere and most organisations are looking to deploy the fabled technology in a bid to improve efficiencies and reduce costs. However, it can be difficult for business leaders to get the results or know where to start, especially when leading consultancies push for aspirational approaches that propose to leave every inch of the office automated. In fact, “the technology” does not exist; Automation is not a technology, it’s a shift in operating mode. Implementing automation technology simply shifts work from people to machines either gradually or in a step change. Harnessing automation is about business transformation; a journey which is enabled not by one fabled non-existent technology but by many real technologies which actually very work well. In fact, Gartner suggests that as many as 72 per cent of automation projects fail, despite >86 per cent of the projects being a technological success.

This really highlights the importance of planning for transformation before selecting the technology – which is often the opposite of the guidance given by many project leaders today. Rather than being guided from a people centric approach, it’s best to start thinking from a machine centric perspective and, although this can be easy, it is a step change in thinking.

By analysing the organisations operations from a machine centric perspective, it’s easier to set out appropriate goals from the outset. Beyond the cry of “we must have bots!”, it’s far too easy to steam ahead and commit random acts of automation – which serve limited benefit to the business or its employees. The reality is that this is likely to alienate the workforce, encourage cultural dissent, and break working operations… at machine speed. Accepting that it’s not possible or necessary for current technology to automate everything is often perceived as going against the current popular belief, but this is still very much a reality. To be successful in deploying the “robot” workforce, the goal must be to create a hybrid; man:machine environment, where employees and machines work together for the greater good.

Adopting a mindset for automation

Once business leaders have decided to go ahead with a workforce transformation project, it’s important that the concept is introduced and maintained with staff in the right way. Allowing increased fear around how automation will replace certain jobs will have detrimental effects at every stage. Cultural resistance in the initial design relies on full participation of subject matter experts these are best selected from current operations.

It’s important to keep in mind that people always tend to revert back to “manual workarounds” which ultimately undermine automation. It’s best to focus attention on how automation can be used to help employees carry out the parts of their jobs they dislike. Whether it be preventing weekend working, late nights, poor quality or improving productivity – spelling out the individual benefits will drive better participation and improve employee satisfaction. Embracing the fact that the definition of everyone’s role will be changed and focusing on the parts of individuals roles that will remain, or be enhanced, will ensure full participation. Fundamentally, embedding the message that work will be better, more productive and enjoyable will directly deliver operational benefits to the organisation, customers and the overall economy.

A good example of successful implementation comes from the telecoms industry; traditionally teams in the network operation centres would be monitoring screens and managing alarms, rather than managing faults and monitoring networks. For one tier-1 network operator we work with, intelligently automating this area of the business freed network operations teams from the mundane tasks of fault management and housekeeping. Instead allowing them to be deployed to other more valuable areas of the business such as Customer Solution Design, and New Product Development. In fact, it’s also given those employees the opportunity to reclaim a regular working pattern and focus on aspects of the role which they were time squeezed on; producing significantly higher quality services to customers. In this case automation has helped employees to focus on the aspects of the job they enjoy, rise to higher paid employment and helped the business to triple the divisional revenue. It turned a poorly performing service into an industry leader for whom the employees are proud to work, in turn, reducing staff churn from 21 months to 5 years.       

Defining key objectives

Many businesses talk about reducing costs as the number one outcome for an automation project – however this is really a secondary outcome which can only be achieved once the initial objectives are set. If the goal was truly just to simply reduce costs it doesn’t require automation; you could shut down offices or just fire some people to achieve this. So, there must be more to what you want to achieve as a business for automation to succeed.

Defining objectives is an essential part of the planning process. The objectives must be defined as a subset of the primary measurable outcomes of automation. The business case should be used to translate these to the expected business outcomes. Insight and analytics are intrinsic and help the organisation to determine how it’s progressing against these objectives and thereby the outcomes.

Getting started

Once the objectives have been set it’s important to start selecting initial targets for the technology. It’s critical that organisations work with a provider who has a proven and structured approach with a clear methodology. The initial steps to take when embarking on an automation journey are important and the key actions are outlined below.

  • Identify initial targets based on the agreed objectives
  • Break down complex or complicated processes / workflows and tasks into simple ones.
  • Start with simple single domain tasks – that are known
  • Known tasks are those that
    1. are a sequence of actions
    2. require initial information (inputs)
    3. specific enablers (systems/staff to interface with, and methods to use)
    4. all specific decisions in the task
    5. any output required

However, it’s also important that organisations don’t fall into the trap of optimising or re-engineering processes before they are captured. Equally it can be tempting to automate personal, creative and novel tasks, but this won’t lead to the best results.

Ultimately, automation will change the character of operations as an organisation moves through its automation journey. Hopefully, it will quickly transform the quality of the working environment for every employee involved. Successful automation will establish a continuously changing operation which means it must support an agile approach.

Jonathan Hobday, director, Cortex
Image source: Shutterstock/Vasin Lee

Is your IT infrastructure set up to support innovation?

IT Portal from UK - 10 hours 5 min ago

There was a time when IT referenced racks of servers hidden away in office closets or basement data centers, but that’s a thing of the past. Virtually all industries — from global banks to retailers, manufacturers, and healthcare organizations — have experienced some form of market disruption (in some cases massive overhaul, due to evolution in technology). Organizations are either deriving competitive advantages from technology or are actively investing in IT infrastructure to survive amid digital transformation (DX).

International Data Corporation estimates worldwide spending on DX technologies will reach $1.3 trillion in 2018, up 16.8 percent from the $1.1 trillion spent last year.

Consumers have unprecedented access to computing power these days, fueling what’s been coined “Industry 4.0.” This fourth industrial revolution is completely digitizing the manufacturing sector with artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, and the Internet of Things.

It’s creating a data-driven ecosystem across the entire supply chain, and it’s disrupting every industry. Businesses that don’t adapt by upgrading technology will get left behind.

The next industrial revolution

Think about some of the breakout companies achieving exponential growth over the past few years: Airbnb, the largest hospitality chain, doesn’t own any hotel properties. Uber and Lyft, the largest passenger driving companies, don’t own fleets of cars. Instead, both unicorn companies invested in highly scalable, technology-driven concepts and sophisticated IT infrastructures that enabled them to completely disrupt billion-dollar global industries.

These disruptors are changing the game, and companies hoping to compete have no choice but to upgrade IT infrastructure to be more agile and respond to new consumer expectations. Machine-to-machine communication, AI, and other sophisticated analytical tools drive innovation and inform business strategies in real time. These technologies improve customer experience and employee productivity by transforming both front- and back-office processes. They help inform physicians' decisions at the bedside and alert nurses who monitor hundreds of digitally monitored beds. They define new risk thresholds for traders who leverage cloud computing and AI platforms to vet effectiveness of trades from previous days.

A recent McKinsey study found superior digital strategies can boost revenues by more than 15 percent. But despite there being room for technology-driven innovation and heightened revenues, many businesses aren’t effectively harnessing the power of technology. According to an Avaya study, 42 percent of customer issues aren’t resolved on first contact. Less than a third of companies report doing a good job of integrating front-office functions with the back office, even though consumers consider timely delivery the third most important factor of the buying experience.

The “Amazon effect” is alive and well, and organizations need to evolve and embrace technology to thrive.

Surviving in the post-Amazon era

Thanks to Amazon, consumers expect the convenience of shopping from home with fast and cheap delivery. The expectation expands beyond shopping online, though. Consumers want a seamless experience with near-instant results no matter where they are, and Amazon proved it’s possible.

Now retailers across North America and Europe are racing to compete with the e-commerce giant. It’s creating a ripple effect that’s spreading quickly to other industries around the globe.

According to TechCrunch, Amazon is expected to earn more than $250 billion in retail sales in the United States alone in 2018, which eMarketer estimates will account for nearly 50 percent of all online retail spend (up 7 percent from its 43 percent ownership of the online retail marketplace it touts today). The company disrupted the global economy so much that the U.K. is now including the “Amazon effect” in official inflation statistics.

That’s a massive impact for a company that’s only 24 years old. And that’s just one company in one industry. How many industries do you think have been disrupted in that time frame versus the previous 50?

The ease of cloud computing — a business Amazon also happens to be in — eliminated the historic barrier to accessing sophisticated software, analytics, neural networks, and compute platforms for running businesses and turning ideas into reality.

Cloud players are seeing droves of companies leveraging their highly scalable and pay-as-you-go platforms to foster growth and innovation like never before. This disruption is happening, and to thrive amid this rapid change, all businesses must be nimble, innovative, and technology-forward.

Forging a path to the future

A scalable, agile IT infrastructure is needed to leverage modern technologies like AI and blockchain. Legacy network infrastructure simply can’t handle the required speed to market or development time frames — let alone handling a successful delivery on consumer expectations anymore.

Not only are outdated systems too slow, but they also increase risk of cyberattacks and operational failures. The problem with these systems is they don’t easily scale to support emerging platforms and agile business processes. Technology evolves quickly, and failure to keep up leads to problems. It’s important to analyze existing IT infrastructure for four key points.

1. Scalability: Looking two months to five years out, the IT solution needs to grow with your needs in a cost-effective, highly responsive manner. Ask your provider’s team whether they can grow with you from a bandwidth standpoint, as well as technology evolution, cloud partnership, and geography.

2. Customization: It’s important that your technology provider design the right solution specific to your business needs. Your provider should partner with you, sit at the table, and invest in features, functionalities, and network assets that truly empower and fully support your business.

3. Diversity: As Industry 4.0 takes place, communication architecture becomes increasingly ingrained — and thus mission-critical. True network and carrier diversity is essential to business continuity and customer experience.

4. Technology-forward: When investing in go-forward solutions, select partners who continue to invest in their core competency, build out network diversity, invest in more capacity, and expand to new geographic regions. They should also be technology-forward themselves through transparency with design, deployment, self-service platforms, and bills.

Investing in scalable solutions that can evolve with changing requirements is vital in today's Industry 4.0 environment. Companies must embrace digital transformation and invest in IT infrastructure that enables innovation and agility.

Services must be highly resilient, diverse, scalable, and cloud-connected. Providers must be responsive and offer customized solutions. Highly scalable infrastructure (that’s diverse and designed for maximum resiliency and uptime) is the key to remaining competitive and supporting complex, technology-driven initiatives.

DX isn’t a fleeting buzzword; it’s a force to invest in, care about, and flourish from. And if Airbnb and Uber recognized this (and now dominate their respective markets), it’s clear they’re doing something right. Innovation is necessary to survive — let your IT infrastructure achieve it.

Karin Ratchinsky, VP of Marketing at Zayo Group

Image Credit: Everything Possible / Shutterstock

Walmart to use blockchain to ensure food safety

IT Portal from UK - 10 hours 35 min ago

Walmart wants its suppliers to use blockchain technology, to make it easier to track the origin of vegetables. That would make tracking any potential health hazards a much faster, simpler task. Not only that, but the information would be fully transparent, meaning everyone – including the shoppers, could track the origins of the things they’re buying.

At the time being, the company is asking nicely, but firmly. Writing a blog post on the matter, Walmart's Matt Smith expects its suppliers to have a blockchain system set up within a year.

It's seeing what the outbreak of E.coli or Salmonella can do, and it's not taking any chances.

“This change means that the information gathered by these suppliers will be open and accessible through technology that offers real-time, end-to-end traceability from farm to table,” Smith writes. “Blockchain allows for digitized sharing of data in a secure and trusted way.”

Blockchain is a technology that has become extremely popular lately thanks to cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoin. Cryptocurrencies (for the most part) use the same underlying technology – blockchain, to operate.

It works on the principle of a distributed, secure ledger which would make it virtually impossible to tamper with the data, once it's written within the blockchain.  

“Customers trust us to help them put quality food on their tables for themselves and their families,” said Charles Redfield, executive vice president of food for Walmart U.S. “We have to go further than offering great food at an everyday low price. Our customers need to know they can trust us to help ensure that food is safe. These new requirements will help us do just that.”

Image Credit: Zapp2Photo / Shutterstock

Cryptocurrency malware leading rise in cyberthreats

IT Portal from UK - 11 hours 35 min ago

Malware that mines cryptocurrency for hackers is on the rise. McAfee's latest security report, the McAfee Labs Threats Report: September 2018 says the trend of creating malware that mines crypto on unsuspecting victims' computers rose 86 per cent in the second quarter of 2018, with more than 2.5 million new malware samples.

In the previous quarter of the same year, Q1, McAfee counted 2.9 million new samples, and 400,000 new samples in Q4 2017.

“Cybercrime is a business, and market forces, such as the rise in cryptocurrency values, will continue to shape where adversaries focus their efforts,” said Raj Samani, McAfee Fellow, Chief Scientist at McAfee. “Exploiting cryptomining malware is simpler, more straightforward, and less risky than traditional cybercrime activities – causing these schemes to skyrocket in popularity over the last few months. In fact, cryptomining malware has quickly emerged as a major player on the threat landscape.”

Hackers will create cryptocurrency mining software and try to trick people into downloading and running it. In one example, hackers posted a program on a gaming forum, claiming the program will enhance popular games.

The report also claims that this malware is not only built for Windows-powered machines, but for Android phones, as well. Chinese Android users are being tricked into running the ADB.Miner, which mines Monero for its owners.

The full report, which also tackles other forms of malware like NotPetya and WannaCry, can be found on this link.

Image Credit: Make-Someones-Day / Pixabay

IBM wants to bring AI to every workplace

IT Portal from UK - 12 hours 5 min ago

It seems as IBM is dead serious about bringing its AI-powered machine; Watson, into every pore of our society. The company just announced a major AI toolset, based on the Watson machine, that aims to help businesses in nine industries.

For agriculture, Watson can be used to gather and analyse weather data, IoT tractor data, or satellite imagery, to name a few. For customer service, using AI to answer questions more quickly is considered a major driver. In marketing, Watson can improve productivity. And that is just the tip of the iceberg.

IBM also mentioned 'buildings that talk', saying IBM IoT Buildings Insights can decode exabytes of data created by commercial properties, allowing managers to optimise things like energy efficiency.

Advertising, manufacturing and industrial equipment, human resources, supply chain, AI for vehicles, those are all part of the announcement.

“As data flows continue to increase, people are overwhelmed by the amount of information we have to act on every day, but luckily the information explosion coincides with another key technological advance: artificial intelligence,” said David Kenny, Senior Vice President, IBM Cognitive Solutions.

“AI is the tool professionals need to take advantage of the data that’s now at our fingertips and tailoring general AI for specific industries and professions is a critical way to enable everyone to reach new potential in their daily jobs.”

You can learn more about AI and its effects on business on this link

Image Credit: Enzozo / Shutterstock

Microsoft launches major open data push

IT Portal from UK - 12 hours 35 min ago

Microsoft, Adobe and SAP are announcing a new solution that will help organisations manage customer data a bit better. During the Microsoft Ignite Conference, the CEOs of the three companies announced the Open Data Initiative.

Its goal is to eliminate data silos and create a single view of a customer. That will allow companies to govern data easier, as well as support privacy and security initiatives.

Announcing the new offering in a press release, the three companies said data is every company's strongest asset, but many of them “struggle to attain a complete view”, as much of this information is trapped inside various data silos.

There is also valuable data locked in external silos, among third parties. This new offering aims to eliminate this problem and enable AI-driven business models.

“Adobe, Microsoft and SAP are partnering to reimagine the customer experience management category,” said Shantanu Narayen, CEO, Adobe. “Together we will give enterprises the ability to harness and action massive volumes of customer data to deliver personalized, real-time customer experiences at scale.”

“Together with Adobe and SAP we are taking a first, critical step to helping companies achieve a level of customer and business understanding that has never before been possible,” said Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft. “Organizations everywhere have a massive opportunity to build AI-powered digital feedback loops for predictive power, automated workflows and, ultimately, improved business outcomes.”

“Microsoft, Adobe and SAP understand the customer experience is no longer a sales management conversation,” said Bill McDermott, CEO of SAP. “CEOs are breaking down the silos of the status quo so they can get all people inside their companies focused on serving people outside their companies. With the open data initiative, we will help businesses run with a true single view of the customer.”

No word on potential pricing, or dates. You can find more details about the project on this link.

Image Credit: Asif Islam / Shutterstock

Bolster your tech startup with these measures

IT Portal from UK - 12 hours 50 min ago

While there are a lot of businesses created, not a lot of them survive, let alone become big businesses. This is unfortunate, but luckily there is something you can do about it. You must have the right combination of people, systems, and processes in place. Together these all must focus on investing and growing your business. This is complex so you must plan for it, as well as work to standardise and automate your processes when possible instead of always depending on humans to do the work for you.

Automation leads to scalability

To scale your business, you’ll need to add new personnel, enter new markets and territories, obtain more customers, and offer more products or services. All the while you must also maintain control of your business’ costs and capabilities too. As you do so, you’ll quickly notice how the processes and software that served you well in the beginning no longer work as well today. When this happens you must find a technology platform that can support your business as its processes, transaction volumes and complexity grows. Make sure that the one you choose lets you quickly respond to opportunities and threats without being distracted by the need to maintain unwieldy IT systems. The technology you employ here should free your management team up to see, control, and respond to your business’ changing circumstances so they can run an efficient, customer-centric organisation for you. This is done by automating and integrating operational processes – something that will let you still continually deliver exceptional service to your customers.

Surround yourself with talent

B Plans says you need the knowledge and expertise of the right people if you want to be able to position your tech startup on the cutting edge of its industry. Make sure you continually strive to source and engage your niche’s best talent. By spending time building a well-organised team of competent and dedicated employees you’re giving your startup the “life blood” it needs so it can get closer to its key objectives. Make sure you start working on this early on so people will want to work for your business. As you do so, also make sure to develop a recruiting system that efficiently attracts your field’s top talent. You don’t have the time to waste on a badly-organised recruitment process.

Collect and use data to your advantage

Your data is important throughout your growth process. When you’re able to gain greater insight into your online customer data, you can personalise your products and services so shoppers across multiple channels and markets throughout the world will be interested in seeing what you’ve got. Your drive, ambition and hard work are pivotal points here, as is your ability to recognise technology’s critical role in supporting your brand’s sustainable growth. When you take the time to invest in the right management systems to support your brand’s agile, adaptable growth regardless of the changing market conditions that surround you, eventually your brand will come to a point in which it reaches its full potential.

Build a solid online image

About 81 per cent of shoppers go online (e.g. Google, social media) to conduct some research about companies and the products or services they offer before making a purchase. This is why it’s so important to have a good reputation – especially as your brand identity continues to spread through various digital channels. To run a successful business today you must have a good reputation and a product or service that’s attractive for your target audience. Don’t be afraid to check out how your competition is doing in this regard. Do some market research to find out where your audience hangs out so you can meet them there. You don’t need 5 social media profiles. You simply need to learn where your audience is and interact with them there so you’ll have the best ROI. Use social media scheduling software so you do this consistently. You should also create a company blog to share project news and what’s going on in your company’s life.

Cloud-based systems offer scalability

Small business phone systems help remove communication complexity from business process and help you save precious time. Byte Start says this doesn’t have to be expensive. With today’s modern cloud-based technologies you’ll enjoy scalability, agility and a low overall cost of ownership. This will free you from cumbersome IT overheads so you can manage growth on your terms thanks to technology’s ability to scale with your organisation.

By opting for cloud-based apps that you can use on a global scale and automating manual, time-consuming tasks (e.g. tax compliance, multi-currency transactions), you can remove any major barriers you have standing in the way of an international business expansion. Of course, when you do undergo such an expansion you’re bound to be faced with financial consolidation, order management, inventory management, customer relationship management (CRM), and increasingly complex tax compliance laws while you’re also facing a growing volume of multi-currency, multi-language, and multi-country transactions. These things are easier to manage from within one cloud-based business management system that harnesses scalability, flexibility, and agility so your business can run more efficiently and be more aggressive about its expansion plans.

Manage your growth

Don’t overlook the problems that come with premature scaling. Doing so is a huge mistake – one that’s caused the failure of many startups.

To understand premature scaling, you must first understand scaling. This is a specific point in your startup’s life where positive growth is experienced. When this happens, scaling can happen in many ways, including acquiring new employees and increasing your marketing budget. You’ll know you’ve reached this point because you’ll make more sales. The problem here starts when you’re focused on advancing one area of your business without properly synchronising the other parts so they can grow along with it. Unfortunately, this is a problem that about 70 per cent of businesses face today – and one that causes the failure of about 74 per cent of them. As such, you must pay attention to the early signs of premature scaling (e.g. too many employees) and act immediately. Do so by returning your focus to your customers, finding out gather their feedback is, and changing your products or services to meet their needs.

Evan Morris, Networking Manager, MWR
Image Credit: SFIO CRACHO / Shutterstock

What is GDPR? Everything you need to know

IT Portal from UK - 14 hours 26 min ago
GDPR: What's new

25/09 - FEATURE - Alexander Bachmann/Admitad - GDPR: The new European data protection law and its impacts on affiliate marketers - Marketers and advertisers who use affiliate networks also must be aware of the GDPR’s impact on their industry. With this sudden shift in privacy laws, affiliate marketers have their own set of questions that they need answered to properly adapt...

21/09 - NEWS - Canadian data firm hit with first ever GDPR notice - AIQ was accused by the Information Commissioner's Office of using people's data for “purposes which they would have not expected“...

14/09 - NEWS - Companies still struggling with some parts of GDPR - Even months after the new legislation, GDPR is still proving a challenge...

04/09 - FEATURE - Paul Tarantino/ConsentEye - What not to do with your GDPR consent request emails - Building a contact database based on who, when and how consent was given, prevents individuals being bombarded with information they do not want and allows a company to feel confident that they are staying in line with the GDPR...

31/08 - FEATURE - Jon Fielding/Apricorn - Mind the GDPR gaps: the biggest risks that remain for UK companies - Three months on, what are the biggest areas of risk for UK companies?

22/08 - FEATURE - Campbell Hutchinson/Datto - GDPR: An opportunity rather than a burden - Anyone charged with protecting data should assume it’s the most important data in the world – otherwise they will run into problems down the road...

22/08 - NEWS - Many UK firms still won't pass GDPR inspection - Months after GDPR implementation, businesses are still not compliant...

21/08 - FEATURE - Jonathan Bridges/Exponential-e - Applying the MOT model to businesses in a post-GDPR landscape - GDPR compliance is the perfect opportunity to assess your business and its practices...

21/08 - NEWS - Third party cookies see major drop thanks to GDPR - Many major players may not have seen a significant impact though...

15/08 - NEWS - A third of businesses still aren't GDPR compliant - It’s been almost three months since GDPR kicked off, and businesses are still struggling to become compliant...

15/08 - FEATURE - Natasha Bougourd/TSG - Can digital transformation, IT security and GDPR compliance all be prioritised? - If your business is looking to focus on digital transformation but is short on resource, outsourcing your IT support will allow you to fully focus on transformation...

14/08 - FEATURE - Darren Barker/Hitachi Vantara - Navigating data regulation: achieving data governance success in a post-GDPR world - Data governance can be so much more than a solution to regulation...

08/08 - NEWS - GDPR means over 1,000 US news sites are still unavailable in EU - US news outlets choose to block EU visitors instead of complying with GDPR...

06/08 - NEWS - British consumers are already taking advantage of GDPR - Over half of UK consumers will activate their GDPR rights within a year...

06/08 - FEATURE - Mervyn Kelly/Ciena - Implementing a holistic data protection strategy post-GDPR - The new regulation not only applies to businesses but also to the network operators who handle in-flight data...

26/07 - FEATURE - Mike Puglia/Kaseya - Ensure GDPR compliance with these top tips - Cut through the noise and ensure your company’s complete compliance by following the tips below...

23/07 - FEATURE - Eric Bassier/Quantum - Assessing the impact of GDPR on your data backup and archive - The new regulation has completely changed the process of storing and archiving customer data...

23/07 - FEATURE - David Emm/Kaspersky Lab - The negative impacts of GDPR - Though new data laws offer enhanced data protection for consumers, some unexpected consequences of the legislation have now also started to rise to the surface...

20/07 - FEATURE - Chris Watkins/Ultima - SMEs look to RPA to improve GDPR compliance and staff productivity - It seems that many SMBs are already unlocking the power of RPA to improve efficiency, allowing them to use their best asset - their employees – to focus on and undertake more transformative activities...

19/07 - NEWS - GDPR has made life easier for cyberciminals - Removal of PII data from Whois records makes protecting Internet users increasingly difficult for security professionals...

19/07 - NEWS - Insider security threats fall following GDPR - Some cyber threats are shrinking in the UK and Germany, new research suggests...

16/07 - FEATURE - John O'Keeffe/Looker - Why tackling data swamps is key to long-term GDPR compliance - The days of storing data without a reason for doing so have come to an end...

10/07 - NEWS - Businesses are collecting more data than they can handle - even after GDPR - Many companies may be biting off more than they can chew...

05/07 - FEATURE - Neil Patel/D-Link - A guide to GDPR: What will it have in store for video surveillance? - After May 25 2018, the way CCTV video footage is captured and handled must change to fit with the new GDPR guidelines introduced by EU...

05/07 - FEATURE - Darron Gibbard/Qualys - GDPR is here to stay – these reports can help you maintain compliance - GDPR should be viewed as a set of ongoing requirements across the organisation when it comes to handling, managing and storing data...

04/07 - FEATURE - Andy Dale/SessionM - GDPR: an opportunity for better customer engagement - The new regulation can help your organisation build deeper and more personalised experiences for your customers...

04/07 - FEATURE - Colin Truran/Quest - Why GDPR damage control has done more harm than good - As more and more businesses are now looking to cover their backs and demonstrate varying degrees of compliance to their users, this new era of data privacy awareness could be more than many businesses bargained for...

02/07 - FEATURE - Dr Guy Bunker/Clearswift - GDPR: A tool for your enemies? - Every employee at your organisation should be prepared to deal with right to be forgotten requests...

02/07 - NEWS - GDPR was huge drain on resources for many companies - Three quarters per cent of organisations saw high costs in getting GDPR compliant...

29/06 - FEATURE - Hervé Buttignol/Clarion Europe - The impact of GDPR on international corporate groups - By improving data protection for individuals, the EU has forced multinationals to think critically about the design and security of their Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems and localised intranet...

29/06 - FEATURE - Georgie White/Mediaworks - After GDPR: how your paper documents could still be affected - When it comes to paper documents, you can never be fully sure that you're being compliant with GDPR and this can present itself as a huge problem...

28/06 - FEATURE - Enno Lueckel/Ephesoft - Managing the EU GDPR - How professional data management can help companies avoid penalties...

26/06 - NEWS - Top regulators seeking EU GDPR exceptions - Exceptions would allow easier investigation into fraud and market manipulation...

25/06 - FEATURE - Amit Dua/SunTec - Do GDPR and PSD2 contradict each other? - To comply to both regulations and satisfy their customers, companies need a granular view of their customer data and use this data according to their customers’ needs...

21/06 - FEATURE - Jean-Michel Franco/Talend - GDPR: Enabling businesses to liberate their data and enhance customer services - While the new regulation does come with its challenges, it also provides opportunities for businesses willing to go the extra mile...

15/06 - NEWS - ICANN reveals how it responded to GDPR - ICANN's president acknowledges the organisation began the process of GDPR compliance quite late...

14/06 - NEWS - Dixons Carphone breach could have been even more expensive under GDPR - Data breach could have been even more costly had it fallen under new GDPR rules...

11/06 - FEATURE - Theresa Abbamondi/NETSCOUT - Protecting network availability for GDPR compliance - Securing your network and the data stored on it is a key step to complying with the new regulation...

11/06 - NEWS - GDPR was a major hiring boom for London - GDPR-related jobs are making up for the flat line in new vacancies...

07/06 - FEATURE - Peter Waters/Equinix - The wait is finally over…now what’s next for GDPR? - GDPR has begun to shift the mindsets of companies worldwide on the issue of personal data privacy...

07/06 - FEATURE - Andrew North/bluesource - GDPR – the checklist - Now that the new regulation has come into effect it is time to double check your organisation's policies and practices...

06/06 - FEATURE - Roman Taranov/RGK Mobile - M-Commerce and GDPR - Direct carrier billing can help ease some of the burden when it comes to dealing with customer data under the new regulation...

06/06 - FEATURE - David Buckingham/Ecrebo - How will personalisation be affected in a post-GDPR world? - Retailers must think twice about how they acquire and use data for personalisation under the new regulation...

04/06 - NEWS - Okta - Why GDPR won’t be a bloodbath - Okta security chief tells us why GDPR will mean changes, but why your company shouldn’t be afraid...

04/06 - FEATURE - David Jones/Nuxeo - Don't forget SARs in your GDPR content strategy - Businesses often overlook the fact that they will have to provide Subject Access Requests to consumers under the new regulation...

31/05 - FEATURE - Benji Vaughn/Disciple - GDPR: Creating a world where everyone is a publisher - Despite short term pain for email marketers, GDPR is net positive for the UK’s economy long-term...

30/05 - FEATURE - Eric Schrock/Delphix - The GDPR vanishing act - By adopting pseudonymisation, businesses can be prepared in the event that a customer wishes to be erased completely...

30/05 - NEWS - Marc Benioff calls for USA GDPR - Salesforce CEO highlights the need for national privacy laws as the company reports increased revenues...

29/05 - FEATURE - Egil Bergenlind/DPOrganizer - Debunking seven misconceptions surrounding GDPR - As the implementation date is here it's time to address seven of the most common misconceptions that currently surround GDPR...

29/05 - NEWS - Facebook, Google, hit with first GDPR lawsuits - Privacy campaigner issues cases against online giants...

28/05 - NEWS - GDPR offers competitive advantage, businesses believe - Despite the positive outlook, many are still not ready...

25/05 - FEATURE - Jeff Sakasegawa/Sift Science - 5 things to do now for GDPR compliance - With the regulation set to go into effect today, now is the time for your organisation to invest in compliance...

25/05 - NEWS - GDPR era starts today - May 25 is finally upon us, which means the EU legislation, General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), has now come into effect...

25/05 - NEWS - Universities spent half a million pounds on GDPR preparations -Cranfield University was the biggest spender, unlike Heythrop College...

25/05 - NEWS - Box reveals multi-region support ahead of GDPR - UK one of eight regions to get upgrade for Box Zones...

24/05 - FEATURE - Chad Wollen/Smartpipe - Will the Facebook scandal lead to a ‘hard’ GDPR? - Businesses should learn from Facebook's example and prepare accordingly for the upcoming regulation...

23/05 - NEWS - Companies embracing GDPR compliance to get one step ahead of the competition - IT and Telco businesses are confident GDPR compliance will provide a competitive advantage...

23/05 - FEATURE - Roland Bullivant/Silwood Technology - Eight ways to simplify personal data discovery pre- and post-GDPR deadline - Here we explore the options to finding all Personal Data...

23/05 - FEATURE - Stuart Sykes/Sharp Business Systems - Myth busting common GDPR misconceptions - The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will set out to harmonise data privacy laws across the EU and beyond. But do you know the full facts?

23/05 - NEWS - GDPR allowing Brits to spring clean their data - For Brits, the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation will allow them to conduct a sort of ‘spring cleaning’ of companies holding their data...

23/05 - NEWS - Charities aren't ready for GDPR - Only 30 per cent of charities will be ready for GDPR on May 25...

22/05 - NEWS - Microsoft lays out its GDPR vision - Microsoft will extend key GDPR rights to consumers worldwide...

21/05 - FEATURE - Roy Pereira/Zoom.ai - Will GDPR hinder or harness the power of AI? - The upcoming regulation will force companies to rethink the way they approach AI deployment...

21/05 - NEWS - Over half of consumers not re-opting in after GDPR - GDPR isn't changing people's habits just yet...

21/05 - FEATURE - Nigel Tozer/Commvault - Data management in the era of GDPR and digital transformation - By adopting a comprehensive data strategy businesses can keep their data safe without slowing their digital transformation efforts...

18/05 - FEATURE - Sharon Heys/SANS Institute - With GDPR upon us, here's what the C-Suite needs to know about cyber security - All members of your organisation should be properly prepared for the upcoming regulation, even the C-Suite...

17/05 - NEWS - 85% of organisations likely to miss out on GDPR deadline - UK firms are the most prepared and some have even begun to reap the benefits of being early...

17/05 - NEWS - Businesses still leaking data as GDPR looms around the corner - A fifth of UK businesses have had their data stolen...

16/05 - NEWS - UK businesses think GDPR will make them more competitive - Medium-sized businesses were the most optimistic while smaller businesses were the least confident...

16/05 - NEWS - GDPR will help businesses boost security - The upcoming regulation presents an opportunity for businesses to improve data privacy and security...

11/05 - NEWS - GDPR may make some users more likely to share their data - The new regulation is making people more comfortable around businesses...

11/05 - NEWS - Google reveals its plans for your data after GDPR - The company has published a blog post detailing its operations after May 25...

10/05 - FEATURE - Jim Liddle/Storage Made Easy - GDPR compliance countdown: the final checklist - Is your organisation fully prepared for the upcoming regulation?

10/05 - FEATURE - James Eggleston/appScatter - What do app developers need to know about GDPR? - General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is going to mean big changes for all businesses; data consent must be proven and the consumers can now withdraw consent at their discretion, at any time...

09/05 - FEATURE - Nigel Crockford/eSpida - HR’s role in GDPR - With its strong history of safeguarding data, the HR department can help lead your businesses compliance efforts...

09/05 - FEATURE - Caitlyn Huey/EclecticIQ - The impact of GDPR on threat intelligence analysts - The upcoming regulation will place restrictions on the amount of data available to threat intelligence analysts...

08/05 - NEWS - Many firms still behind on GDPR, with just weeks to go - As GDPR moves closer, confidence among business leaders is low...

07/05 - FEATURE - Marc Linster/EnterpriseDB - GDPR will turn DBAs into superheroes - There are three areas where DBAs can stress test the strengths and weaknesses of a company’s strategy to rescue the organisation from the dangers within...

03/05 - FEATURE - Jaclyn Miller/Secure-24 - GDPR insight and how to prepare for compliance - Deciding how data will be used, for what purpose and by whom is paramount to complete data governance...

02/05 - FEATURE - Tony Smith/PCI Pal - PCI and GDPR: How to be cross-compliant - For some time companies have been working, to ensure that they don’t fall foul of these new regulations, but with zero hour rapidly approaching, many are still left with much to do...

26/04 - NEWS - Vast majority of companies aren't GDPR compliant - General Data Protection Regulation is less than a month away, yet 93 per cent of global organisations are not yet fully compliant...

26/04 - NEWS - Government spending on GDPR revealed - More details on specific expenditure revealed, with Department for Transport shelling out £547,000...

26/04 - FEATURE - Jean-Michel Franco/Talend - Building data lakes for GDPR compliance - Continuous compliance is required and most organisations are having to create new policies that will help them achieve a privacy by design mode...

25/04 - NEWS - GDPR: One month to go - the industry speaks - Some of the technology world's top minds share their advice and opinions on GDPR...

25/04 - NEWS - Half of businesses still unprepared for GDPR - With a month to go, KPMG warns an overwhelming majority of businesses haven't scrutinised third parties for possible compliance issues...

24/04 - FEATURE - Nigel Linton/Engage Hub - Personalising the customer experience in the midst of GDPR - The upcoming regulation can serve as a jumping off point for businesses to offer further personalisation...

23/04 - FEATURE - Adrian Newby/Crownpeak - Compliance with GDPR is not enough. We must aim higher - GDPR is an opportunity for businesses to return the control of personal data to the individual and improve trust...

20/04 - FEATURE - Dana Averbouch/NICE -  Understanding the impact of GDPR on the customer journey - The mere idea of GDPR brings anxiety and trepidation to many. This shouldn’t be the case...

19/04 - NEWS - More than half of retailers aren't ready for GDPR - Retailers utilise data to personalise the customer experience.

19/04 - FEATURE - David Trossell/Bridgeworks - GDPR: move that data securely - Data must be encrypted and backed up properly in multiple locations to ensure its security...

19/04 - FEATURE - Tom Homer/Telstra - The open data debate – is GDPR a burden or benefit? - But in a world that’s increasingly shaped by open data, what are some of the risks and opportunities related to the introduction of GDPR?

18/04 - NEWS - Facebook unveils new data protection rules ahead of GDPR - Users will soon be able to view, delete and control how their data is shared more easily...

16/04 - FEATURE - Tom Dolan/ForeScout - Cyber-attacks post GDPR: a doomsday scenario - By putting adequate security measures in place now, organisations can avoid financial penalties when the new regulation goes into effect...

12/04 - NEWS - GDPR non-compliance could spell the end for a third of businesses - Some businesses don't know where they store their data....

12/04 - NEWS - GDPR and digital transformation renew European faith in private cloud - GDPR seems to be forcing enterprise cloud adoption in a completely different direction...

11/04 - NEWS - NHS Trusts have spent more than £1million preparing for GDPR - A total of £1,076,549 was spent by 46 different Trusts across the UK...

03/04 - FEATURE - Sandy Hathaway/Exit3x - Afraid of GDPR? Here’s why you shouldn’t be (and how to embrace it) - The upcoming regulation can serve as a framework for improvement if approached with the right mindset...

03/04 - FEATURE - Larry Zulch/Savvius - How to prepare for GDPR breach reporting using packet-based NPMD tools - The language of Article 33 states that companies must inform the authorities “without undue delay and, where feasible, not later than 72 hours after becoming aware of it.”

30/03 - NEWS - Apple tweaks privacy controls to conform with GDPR - Changes to AppleID policy enforced with GDPR set to apply from May 25, 2018...

27/03 - FEATURE - Jim Bowes/Manifesto - How organisations can turn GDPR into an opportunity for digital transformation and to boost consumer trust - GDPR should be seen as opportunity for digitally savvy - and even less digitally savvy - businesses to get their house in order...

27/03 - NEWS - Data Protection Officers in high demand ahead of GDPR - Impending GDPR deadline sees surge in related vacancies, with DPO jobs soaring...

26/03 - FEATURE - Martin Ojala/Pipedrive - GDPR and sales teams – three steps to compliance - The upcoming regulation could have significant implications for sales teams as they control a great deal of personal data...

22/03 - FEATURE - Richard Agnew/Code42 - GDPR is your chance to prepare your security strategy for digital transformation - By taking action today businesses can safeguard their data to avoid penalties when GDPR goes into effect...

22/03 - FEATURE - Mayank Choudhary/ObserveIT - GDPR threats: how to mitigate data exfiltration exploits - Is your organisation ready for the upcoming regulation?

21/03 - FEATURE - Mike McEwan/ICONFIRM - The impact of GDPR on the public sector - With the much-publicised General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) coming into effect in May 2018, the public sector is facing a range of challenges to ensure compliance in time for the deadline...

19/03 - FEATURE - Simon Johnson/Freshworks - GDPR and IT Service Management – looking at data and service together - IT service desk teams and the personal data they store should be included in any GDPR compliance programme...

16/03 - FEATURE - Darron Gibbard/Qualys - The 'End-to-End Management' mentality: how to achieve GDPR compliance across the board - With the deadline fast approaching, businesses must make GDPR compliance a top priority...

15/03 - NEWS - WhatsApp will not share user data with Facebook until it complies with GDPR - ICO concludes investigation into how WhatsApp and Facebook share user data...

15/03 - FEATURE - Mark Baker/Canonical - GDPR: Preparing the cloud industry for compliance - Public cloud services can be extremely secure and often can be a more secure option than in-house systems...

14/03 - NEWS - Companies rushing to hire data protection officers pre-GDPR - Quarter of all vacancies posted since the beginning of the year concern data protection...

14/03 - FEATURE - Anthony Oliver/Performanta - GDPR vs DLP: Avoiding the clash of the titans - The one glaring difference between these two titans is that while GDPR is designed to protect privacy, DLP is, by its very nature, designed to evade it...

09/03 - NEWS - UK businesses in need of a GDPR reality check - Government should have done more to inform organisations what GDPR is, new report says...

07/03 - FEATURE - Sunil Pai, Richard Thornton, Mohan Bhatia/Wipro - GDPR and effective implementation for finance businesses - GDPR compliance will be an integral part of all business operations going forward...

06/03 - NEWS - UK consumers reveal worry over online data sharing - GDPR could lead to millions of 'right to be forgotten' requests...

05/03 - FEATURE - Boris Kontsevoi/Intetics - Becoming GDPR compliant: Quickly, effectively and risk-free - In many aspects, General Data Protection Regulation shifts the way we handle data and most importantly grants new powers to data subjects...

01/03 - NEWS - GDPR 'right to be forgotten' still confusing many organisations - Protecting user data will be a major part of GDPR compliance...

27/02 - NEWS - London councils spent over £1 million preparing for GDPR - Software, training, and hiring of staff are among the major expenses...

27/02 - FEATURE - Martin DeMartini/Y Soft - Organisations need to consider their print infrastructure as part of GDPR compliance - Looking at the typical enterprise workflow solutions management setup, there are a number of obligations related to the providing organisation under GDPR...

26/02 - FEATURE - Shane Nolan/IDA Ireland - It's now or never to prepare for GDPR – 100 days to go – What should I do? - The clock is ticking and professional support may be needed to help prepare your organisation for the upcoming regulation...

23/02 - NEWS - Microsoft boosts GDPR preparation tools for businesses - New solutions aim to make it easier for businesses to comply with GDPR...

23/02 - FEATURE - Sean Hanford/Bluesource - The GDPR journey – 6 steps that must be taken now - Preparing for the upcoming regulation must be a top priority for all organisations...

16/02 - NEWS - GDPR: Over a third of Brits say they will exercise right to be forgotten - They are not confident about businesses using their data...

14/02 - FEATURE - 100 days to GDPR - the industry speaks - With the clock ticking down to GDPR, we ask the technology industry for their advice...

12/02 - NEWS - Three quarters of UK businesses are ready for EU GDPR - Despite Brexit, optimism is high, with some organisations spending up to £3.5 million on becoming compliant...

06/02 - NEWS - Companies still ill-prepared for GDPR - Time is running out and many companies are idly standing by, IDM report claims...

02/02 - FEATURE - Matos Kapetanakis/Yeep - GDPR - changing the rules of identity and access management - Controlling who has access to employee and user data is key to complying with the upcoming regulation...

01/02 - NEWS - Many businesses lack proper plan for alerting customers to a data breach - This is despite GDPR being clear that organisations need to notify victims of a data breach within 72 hours...

01/02 - FEATURE - Gavin Russell/Wavex - Three IT steps to make your GDPR compliance journey smoother - Is your organisation prepared to comply with the upcoming regulation?

30/01 - NEWS - Businesses underestimating the scope of change GDPR will bring - Many companies will need to hire new people to tackle new problems...

25/01 - NEWS - UK businesses urged to prepare for GDPR data protection laws - Digital and Culture Secretary warns businesses and charities to make sure they are ready as research reveals half of organisations are not prepared...

24/01 - FEATURE - David Fearne/Arrow ECS - GDPR is coming but there’s no need to press the panic button - There’s no need to start from scratch, here are four ways to assess your current processes and make them GDPR ready...

24/01 - NEWS - Many start-ups not prepared for GDPR - Deadline for new regulations is coming closer, but many businesses still aren't ready, report says...

24/01 - FEATURE - James Barham/PCI Pal - PCI, GDPR and the contact centre - The vast amount of personal information and data handled by contact centres daily puts them at great risk under the new regulation...

22/01 - NEWS - Quarter of London businesses unprepared for GDPR - Some firms still believe new regulations aren't relevant to their business, but others say they need more time...

18/01 - FEATURE - Rob Pickering/IPCortex - How to create business value from GDPR - Implementing data classification correctly will allow businesses to take advantage of contextual communication...

18/01 - FEATURE - Jes Breslaw/Delphix - GDPR: The countdown begins - Implementing a DataOps program could aid your organisation in complying with the upcoming regulation...

17/01 - FEATURE - Camilo Lascano Tribin/Advantage - Personal privacy and security: Why I’m thankful for the GDPR - Personal privacy and security. These are, without doubt, the two most salient reasons why I, and you, should be/am thankful a legislation like the GDPR has been brought into law across Europe and the United Kingdom...

08/01 - FEATURE - Jim Crook/CTERA Networks - How enterprise file services can help ensure GDPR compliance - A large number of organisations are still unsure about what steps they need to take in order to remain compliant...

05/01 - FEATURE - Nick Hardy/Anagram Systems - How ERP software can help your business achieve GDPR compliance - There is a number of ways in which centralising personal data within an ERP system can help a business as it works towards GDPR compliance...

04/01 - FEATURE - Chris Niggel/Okta - GDPR 2018: More than just compliance - The upcoming regulation will give businesses an incentive to get their data under control...

02/01 - NEWS - Even big businesses still aren't ready for GDPR - Majority of Fortune 500 and FTSE 350 companies have majorly underestimated their compliance with GDPR, study finds...

25/12 - FEATURE - Jon Geater/Thales eSecurity - Consumer power means businesses have more to worry about from the GDPR than fines - The EU GDPR well and truly puts the onus on businesses to get their houses in order...

22/12 - FEATURE - Christy Haragan/MarkLogic - GDPR - Data, Individuals, and Deletion - While data gathering and collection was initially seen as an entirely positive thing, opinion has turned as stricter legal requirements are placed on storing and holding the data...

22/12 - FEATURE - Rob Mellor/WhereScape - Getting ready for GDPR; where to start and how do you set yourself up for compliance success? - The upcoming regulation is approaching fast and now is the time for businesses to prepare...

22/12 - FEATURE - Rami Alanko/Beemray - Why we should stop seeing GDPR as the Great Data Panic Reason - Many marketers agree with the principle of clean, current and permitted data but then look at their data inheritance - legacy systems, a hodgepodge of silos - and despair...

20/12 - FEATURE - Martin Collins/Ultima Business Solutions - IT isn’t the holy grail of GDPR – it’s an enabler - IT departments have some excellent tools that they can deploy to help ensure business processes meet the GDPR guidelines, but the IT department can’t meet GDPR guidelines by itself...

20/12 - FEATURE - Tom Moore/Litmos Heroes - GDPR – now is the time to act! - There is plenty of scaremongering going on when it comes to GDPR and as the countdown to May 2018 continues, it’s a topic that’s likely to earn even more column inches...

19/12 - FEATURE - Kolvin Stone/Orrick - Shining light on GDPR: Practical insights to provide clarity on compliance - Every organisation that does business with the EU must prepare accordingly for the upcoming regulation...

18/12 - FEATURE - Jon Fielding/EMEA Apricorn - GDPR compliance: Do you know what you don’t know? - Misconceptions still remain and threaten to trip organisations up – even those that have a path to compliance and are making solid progress with it...

15/12 - NEWS - Almost half of brand websites still not GDPR compliant - GDPR, or General Data Protection Regulation, is expected to come into force on May 25 2018...

13/12 - FEATURE - Lisa Chittenden/The Data Compliance Doctors - A six-month checklist for GDPR - Is your organisation ready for the upcoming regulation?

12/12 - FEATURE - Adrian Barrett/Exonar - Data shock: how will the British public react to the GDPR? - The GDPR is designed to give citizens more control of the information that companies hold on them and how that information is used...

08/12 - FEATURE - Matt Smith/SoftwareAG - GDPR: Showing transparency and commitment - The upcoming regulation presents a great chance for businesses to lay a strong foundation for their futures...

06/12 - NEWS - As GDPR draws ever closer, companies still worry about compliance - IT professionals believe that their employer will not be ready for the GDPR rules come May 2018...

05/12 - NEWS - UK businesses don't have the money to pay GDPR fines - More than half are not financially prepared in case they fail to comply with the GDPR...

05/12 - NEWS - GDPR set to create a cultural shift - Businesses might reward employees that adhere to new GDPR data rules, and punish those that don't...

05/12 - FEATURE - Lynda Kershaw/Macro 4 - GDPR: What to do when customers demand access to personal data - Organisations storing personal information, should be prepared to process a large number of data access requests when GDPR goes into effect...

05/12 - FEATURE - Philip Fabinger/HERE Technologies - Is GDPR fit for the digital era? - As organisations prepare to comply with GDPR they must not lose sight of the ePrivacy Regulation...

04/12 - FEATURE - Linus Chang/Scram Software - Encryption’s role in GDPR compliance and cloud data security - It has never been more important to review all IT security practices and avoid becoming a statistic...

30/11 - FEATURE - Sathiya Narayanan/Wipro Limited - Is your test data GDPR compliant? Key strategies to adopt GDPR regulations for testing - Test data management is often overlooked by organisations preparing to comply with the upcoming regulation...

29/11 - FEATURE - Eyal Aharoni/Cymulate - The GDPR Deadline: Where are we at? - The upcoming regulation has wide reaching implications for businesses in the EU as well as the companies they do business with...

23/11 - FEATURE - Dan Martland/Edge Testing Solutions - Innovating within the new guidelines is biggest threat to GDPR compliance - Becoming a GDPR-compliant organisation is a major undertaking and remaining compliant requires an ongoing commitment...

21/11 - FEATURE - Frank Krieger/iland - Brexit and the GDPR pose a risk for UK cloud providers - This is an assessment of the current state of play and the likely effects on cloud companies as both Brexit and the GDPR loom closer...

21/11 - FEATURE - Richard Walters/CensorNet - GDPR: There is no magic formula - Preparing to abide by the new requirements it will impose has become a top priority amongst both SMEs and large enterprises...

20/11 - NEWS - Millions of UK SMBs 'still not preparing' for GDPR - Report claims many organisations have not even started planning yet, despite GDPR being just six months away...

20/11 - FEATURE - Julian Saunders/PORT.im - How should you use technology to become GDPR compliant? - GDPR has key demands that affect the technology choices and technical approaches that a business has to make.

17/11 - NEWS - Microsoft previews new GDPR compliance tool - GDPR Compliance Dashboard will allow Microsoft cloud customers to make sure they are equipped for the new legislation...

16/11 - NEWS - Only a fifth of UK large businesses are ready for GDPR - Survey reveals many big companies are nowhere near ready for the May 25th deadline...

14/11 - FEATURE - José Alberto Ruiz/Cornerstone OnDemand - GDPR: Where should HR start? - When the new regulation comes into effect, the HR department will be responsible for the personal data it collects on applicants as well as current employees.

14/11 - NEWS - GDPR could hit UK law firms hard - Majority of firms say they are unprepared for the effects of GDPR, but also need to up cybersecurity protection, CenturyLink study finds...

09/11 - NEWS - IBM gives clients new control over data as GDPR approaches - Company boosts data control processes at its Frankfurt data centre...

08/11 - FEATURE - Louise Boyd/Me Learning  - E-Learning company helps UK businesses prepare for GDPR - Is your organisation ready for the upcoming regulation?

07/11 - NEWS - Confusion reigns supreme as GDPR draws closer - Trend Micro report throws doubt on security preparedness for many companies as GDPR deadline approaches...

07/11 - FEATURE - Jon Wrennall/Advanced - GDPR: One in four organisations are still unprepared – are you? - By taking action to prepare for GDPR today, your organisation will prevent potential financial and regulatory consequences...

06/11 - NEWS - In-house lawyers urged to 'get to grips' with GDPR - GDPR is coming into force in roughly half a year, but many companies still aren't prepared...

06/11 - FEATURE - Romy Hughes/Brightman - How do you create a GDPR culture? - How do you ensure your people don’t simply work around it and risk landing your organisation with a massive fine?

03/11 - FEATURE - Oliver Wells/Sophos - Teaching the teachers: The importance of online security ahead of GDPR - Schools must implement better security measures to protect their staff and students from cybercrime...

02/11 - FEATURE - Vijay Pawar/MobileIron - Heading off the spectre of GDPR compliance with secure BYOD - With GDPR just months away, locking down data in apps accessing cloud services and securing mobile devices has never been more pressing... 

02/11 - FEATURE - Jed Grant/Peer Mountain - Could a radically different approach to GDPR compliance be enabled by blockchain? - A decentralized system of trust based on blockchain technology could allow customers to control their own personal data...

02/11 - FEATURE - Rajesh Patel/Buffalo Europe - SMEs: GDPR is heading your way, are you compliant? - Why the emergence of two distinct approaches to GDPR compliance and argues that small and medium-sized businesses need to get ahead of the game if they want to avoid paying a high price...

02/11 - FEATURE - Corey Nachreiner/WatchGuard - Global confusion still surrounds GDPR compliance - A look a the worldwide confusion and lack of preparation in the face of looming GDPR deadline...

01/11 - FEATURE - Peter Boyle/Burning Tree - Get GDPR Ready - What you need to know? - Time is running out to ensure your orgranisation is prepared for the upcoming regulation...

31/10 - FEATURE - Emil Eifrem/Neo4j - Data connections can take the complexity out of GDPR - Graph database technology is the answer to smoothing the path in dealing with the upcoming changes that will have a big impact on business...

30/10 - FEATURE - Mike Wake/SAS UK & Ireland - GDPR: The consumer affect - As the regulation moves ever closer, it is now on the consumer to take advantage of the opportunities available to them...

30/10 - FEATURE - Neal Thoms/Fasthosts - Getting your business ready for the GDPR - Preparing for the upcoming regulation should be a top priority for every organisation...

25/10 - FEATURE - Todd Ruback/Evidon - Why IT departments must lead the GDPR charge - Organisations will give the control of personal data back to the people under the new regulation...

25/10 - NEWS - DataIQ - Why GDPR could be the catalyst for change that your business needs - DataIQ CEO Adrian Gregory warns that whilst data can be your friend, it needs careful regulation to ensure your business stays protected...

25/10 - NEWS - BlackBerry wants to help your business survive GDPR - New BlackBerry Cybersecurity Consulting services aim to help businesses tackle the challenges of getting ready for GDPR...

24/10 - NEWS - GDPR has businesses worried about cloud services - More than nine in ten (93 per cent) of companies worry about storing their data in the cloud, once GDPR kicks in...

24/10 - FEATURE - David Mackay/Ness Digital Engineering - Technology and GDPR: Is your platform ready? - There are several common challenges arising from GDPR that companies should consider when it comes to making their technology platforms GDPR compliant...

24/10 - FEATURE - Alister Esam/eShare - Board level transparency, GDPR and the need for a lasting compliance framework - With Brexit as a backdrop, in many ways GDPR has come at the worst time...

23/10 - FEATURE - Stephan Romeder/Magic Software Enterprises - GDPR compliance - Systems integration is a good place to start - Companies need to ensure a framework is established to monitor, review and asses the data processing procedures with all necessary safeguards...

19/10 - NEWS - 'One in seven' companies are still unprepared for GDPR - With only seven months before General Data Protection Regulation kicks in, many companies still aren't ready for the new rules...

18/10 - FEATURE - Maya Nix - GDPR – a small word with a potential BIG impact on your start-up - If you haven’t been following the buzz and think it’s irrelevant to your start-up, think again...

11/10 - FEATURE - Mark Gaydos/Nlyte Software - GDPR and data centre management - With the deadline for enforcement occurring in only seven months’ time, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is set to overhaul the way companies manage customer data from the European Union...

29/09 - FEATURE - Liviu Arsene/Bitdefender - GDPR regulations still raising serious concerns to UK companies - Organisations should view GDPR as a set of security best practices and not as just another legislative barrier to overcome...

29/09 - FEATURE - Ian Smith/Invu - GDPR and the ethical use of data - How GDPR will promote a more ethical use of data among businesses, and outlines the penalties facing those which fail to comply...

29/09 - FEATURE - Patrick Kerpan/Cohesive Networks - Why comply? Europe’s GDPR, UK’s Data Protection Bill and your enterprise - There are new legal frameworks for data protection being enacted in the UK and across Europe that impact every multinational company...

28/09 - FEATURE - Dominic Johnstone/Crown Records Management - Britain’s hidden culture of keeping data breaches secret is a big concern ahead of GDPR - Having a clear data protection and information management programme in place are key to dealing with a breach in a timely manner...

26/09 - FEATURE - Rob Coleman/CA Technologies - Fuelling compliance as the deadline for GDPR looms - The May 2018 deadline is quickly approaching and organisations must prepare accordingly for the upcoming regulation...

21/09 - FEATURE - Luther Martin/Micro Focus - GDPR compliance in legacy environments - Format-preserving encryption allows organisations to protect customer data while using pseudonymization...

19/09 - NEWS - London's SMBs 'clueless' about GDPR - Almost half a million SMBs have no idea what's coming next May, report claims...

18/09 - NEWS: Business cloud services a long way from GDPR compliance - Standardisation processes are underway, but it's far from a done job, Netskope report warns...

18/09 - FEATURE - Sarah Hooper/Amaze One - GDPR - An opportunity for business clad in regulatory clothing - The upcoming regulation could encourage cooperation and collaboration between the multiple parties that come together to serve customers...

15/09 - FEATURE - Graham Jarvis - Banking and financial Services: New tech solves GDPR - Looming on the horizon for failing to comply is a dark cloud of significant financial penalties...

13/09 - NEWS: Third of global businesses not sure if they comply with GDPR - A quarter of UK businesses are facing issues when looking to prepare for the new regulations, according to WatchGuard Technologies...

07/09 - NEWS: UK businesses clueless if they're compliant with GDPR - GDPR is less than a year away and UK organisations still don't know who owns the data they create...

01/09 - FEATURE - Ian Daly/Plan B Disaster Recovery - GDPR and disaster recovery compliance – who does the buck stop with? - Disaster Recovery is a prime function that needs to be carefully addressed with regards to GDPR compliance...

31/08 - FEATURE - Brian Rutledge/Spanning - GDPR in the age of SaaS: One SaaS vendor’s journey to compliance - With the deadline for GDPR looming, now is the time for organisations to prepare for the upcoming regulation...

31/08 - FEATURE - Dominik Birgelen/one click AG - What you need to know about GDPR - There's now less than a year before GDPR kicks in, but how will it impact technology companies and more importantly their clients...

25/08 - NEWS - UK executives are clueless about GDPR - One in five executives have no idea about GDPR and the effect it will have on their business, according to study...

17/08 - NEWS - Beware the GDPR cowboys - Companies are being caught out by suppliers over-promising on their GDPR expertise, study warns...

15/08 - NEWS - Rackspace PDP looks to get rid of GDPR regulation headaches - Privacy and Data Protection service offers businesses help in preparing for data legislation such as GDPR...

15/08 - FEATURE - John Shaw/Sophos - Taking stock of GDPR: How ready are we? - Properly implementing a data security policy will help your organisation prepare for the upcoming regulation...

14/08 - FEATURE - José Casinha/OutSystems - Challenges of GDPR for cloud service providers - Organisations must take the time to assess that their CSPs are compliant with GDPR before the deadline...

14/08 - FEATURE - Christy Haragan/MarkLogic - GDPR and the art of consent management - The GDPR requires firms to demonstrate that they have taken all reasonable actions with regard to compliance...

14/08 - FEATURE - Bart Willemsen/Gartner - Key priorities to prepare for EU GDPR - Is  your organisation prepared for the upcoming regulation? 

11/08 - FEATURE - Adrian Barrett/Exonar - Most UK businesses on track for GDPR compliance, but roadblocks remain for some - With less than a year until the implementation of the GDPR, Exonar surveyed the data protection and wider IT community...

09/08 - FEATURE - Anthony Di Bello/Guidance Software - 5 Things you should be doing now to prepare for GDPR compliance - With the upcoming regulation set to go into effect in May 2018, now is the time to prepare accordingly...

09/08 - FEATURE - Darron Gibbard/Qualys - GDPR – Why it’s more than an IT issue - Implementing the correct procedures to comply with GDPR will affect every level of an organisation...

08/08 - FEATURE - James Wickes/Cloudview - Watching the Watchers: Why the CCTV sector needs GDPR - The upcoming regulation could help the sector move into secure cloud data storage and improve data security on cameras...

07/08 - FEATURE - Dr Guy Bunker/Clearswift - The GDPR: The Raison D'être behind the new regulation - Complying with the upcoming regulation may be difficult for organisations now but it will solve problems in the long run...

03/08 - FEATURE - Greg Day/Palo Alton Networks - Four ways to prepare for next year’s EU GDPR legislation - There are several ways in which businesses can prepare themselves ahead of May 2018 - here's what you need to know...

27/07 - FEATURE - Simon Moffatt/ForgeRock - Why a Data Privacy Officer isn’t the solution for GDPR - Applying a customer identity and access management platform to your organisation could better prepare your business for GDPR...

26/07 - FEATURE - Marta Ienco/GSMA - PSD2 and GDPR: Protecting our personal data - By developing GDPR and PSD2, the EU hopes to actively enforce data protection rules and develop a fairer platform for data protection that supports consumers and businesses alike....

25/07 - NEWS - Businesses mistakenly think they're in compliance with GDPR - Veritas report says many companies believe they are up to scratch when it comes to GDPR...

21/07 - FEATURE - Sean Hanford/bluesource - GDPR survival guide - All you need to know about the nature and scope of the Data Protection Regulation reforms, the cross-business challenges they represent and how best to address them...

19/07 - FEATURE: Aaron P. Simpson & Adam Smith/Hunton and Williams - The UK’s commitment to the GDPR - Here are four key areas that organisations should consider when establishing their compliance programmes in preparation for GDPR...

19/07 - FEATURE: Eddie Ginja/KYOCERA Document Solutions  - Are printers your biggest GDPR blind spot? - Since it was first proposed in 2012, the EU’s GDPR has been in and out of the headlines. But now, with under a year until it becomes a reality, for organisations of any size, the countdown really is on - and you can’t opt out, ignore it or claim ignorance...

12/07 - FEATURE:  Ravi Pather/eperi GmbH - Reducing scope of GDPR is one way to avoid fines -  Organisations must not forget that if they first and foremost secure the data that goes into the cloud through encryption or tokenisation and remain in control of the encryption keys, the scope of GDPR can be significantly reduced...

10/07 - FEATURE:  Christopher Glynn/ECS - Countdown to GDPR: Seven steps to compliance -  A staggering 25 per cent of businesses are purportedly still not aware of the EU GDPR, but here are seven steps to start your compliance journey today...

10/07 - NEWS: As time ticks away, GDPR awareness stands still - Businesses all over the world still don't know how how they'll be affected by GDPR, a new report has found...

10/07 - FEATURE: David Trossell/Bridgeworks -  GDPR: Protect your data, recover more quickly - You don’t necessarily have to go out to buy new network, storage and IT infrastructure generally to achieve compliance with GDPR...

07/07 - FEATURE: Richard Lack/Gigya - When does no actually mean no? Analysing consent under GDPR - Under GDPR, Consumers will be empowered to say “no” when targeted with irrelevant marketing material. And more importantly, businesses will have to listen....

07/07 - FEATURE: Mark Sangster/eSentire - The GDPR is coming: Are you prepared? -  GDPR is a sweeping new EU privacy regulation that has extensive implications for U.S. firms too. Here’s how to prepare for it…  

05/07 - FEATURE: Thomas Fischer/Digital Guardian - Breaking down the GDPR into a three-step path to compliance - With less than a year to go until the GDPR deadline, businesses struggling with the new legislation can get ahead by adopting a more consistent approach to compliance...

29/06 - NEWS: UK's public sector 'not ready' for GDPR - new findings claim less than two thirds (59 per cent) are aware of the implications GDPR will have on their organisation....

23/06 - NEWS: IBM launches data management tools to help you get ready for GDPR - new services and tools will make it it easier for organisations to comply with GDPR before next year's deadline...

23/06 - NEWS: EU's new privacy rules should be in line with GDPR, telcos warn - upcoming EU rules governing how businesses use data could slow down innovation and growth in the industry...

 22/06 - FEATURE: Charlie Mayes/DAV Development - Acting on data protection - New legislation such as GDPR can be extremely daunting, there is good reason why we must ensure that we comply.

16/06 - FEATURE: Brian Rutledge/Spanning - The global impact of GDPR: Prepare now, avoid potential litigation & fines later - GDPR impact on business is proving to be one of the most talked about global regulations to-date, related to data governance and data privacy...

15/06 - FEATURE: John Morrell, Datameer - Governing big data analytics for GDPR compliance - GDPR changes the way entire organisations interact with personal data, and thus big data analytics. But more than that, it offers an opportunity for enterprises to change the way they approach governance capabilities…

For all our GDPR stories, click here.

What is GDPR?

The General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, is one of the most important pieces of legislation ever passed for IT departments.

Approved by the European Union in April 2016 and set to come into force in the UK on May 25th, 2018, GDPR is hugely significant for businesses of all sizes as it will greatly affect how they gather, store, and look after their data.

The key tenets of GDPR concern the privacy rights of everyday users and the data they create online, and look to bring together several existing laws and regulations to harmonise rulings across the European Union. 

Under GDPR, companies will also have to be more up front when collecting the personal data of customers - meaning consent will need to be explicitly given, as well as the gatherers needing to detail the exact purpose that this data will be used for.

This personal data will also need to be encrypted by default as part of a process known as pseudonymisation, meaning that it cannot be linked to a specific person without being accompanied by extra information.

Personal data applies to a wide range of information - effectively anything that could be used to directly or indirectly identify a person online. This could include names, email addresses, images, bank details, posts on social networking websites, medical information, or even a computer IP address.

Users will also have the right to know exactly what details a company or organisation holds about them, and also request that any of this information be deleted if they feel their rights to privacy are being infringed as part of the new “right to erasure”.

Companies that suffer data breaches, whether accidental or as part of a cyber-attack, will need to disclose this event to the relevant within 72 hours of it happening - although there is no requirement to notify users unless instructed.

Any organisation found to not be conforming to the new regulation after the May 25th deadline could face heavy fines, equivalent to four per cent of annual global turnover, or €20 million - whichever is greater.

GDPR FAQs

What does GDPR stand for?

GDPR stands for General Data Protection Regulation, also officially known as EU Regulation 2016/679.

Does GDPR replace the DPA?

Yes,  GDPR will replace the UK's existing Data Protection Act, which was first drawn up in 1984.

GDPR is also designed to replace the Data Protection Directive, which initially came into force in 1995, as the EU looks to bring together different regulations and legislation across the continent.

When will GDPR come into force?

GDPR will become enforceable from 25 May 2018, following a two-year transition period.

Being a regulation rather than a directive, GDPR doesn’t require enabling laws to be passed by member states. 

Why is GDPR important?

GDPR is the largest and most comprehensive piece of data regulation ever passed by the European Union, and as mentioned, seeks to unify several pre-existing pieces of legislation.

 Because data protection concerns stretch across national boundaries, the introduction of GDPR seeks not just to regulate data within the EU. It seeks to extend EU data protection law to any organisation holding information on EU citizens, even if that organisation is based outside the EU. 

For businesses, GDPR means keeping a much tighter rein on the data they possess, and should also improve security awareness and protection levels for many. It also affects how companies collect and hold data on individuals such as customers, and governs the export of personal data beyond the EU’s boundaries.

For consumers, GDPR gives them much more clearly defined privacy protection when online. Companies will now have to give explicit notice when asking for personal information, and what they use these details for. Under GDPR, consumers also get a "right to erasure", which is a step up from the current "right to be forgotten", meaning they can apply to have information about them publish online removed.

Who does GDPR apply to? Is my business affected by GDPR?

Short answer - yes. If you are a business that deals with online data in any way, you will need to comply with GDPR before next year’s deadline.

As mentioned before, if you fail to bring your organisation up to speed before May 25th, 2018, the EU rules state that you can be fined up to four per cent of annual global turnover, or €20 Million - whichever is greater.

Businesses will need to be able to demonstrate that they comply with the principles. To do this they’ll need to have documentation in place that shows how they’re processing data, they may also need to appoint a data protection officer.  

Will GDPR apply after Brexit?

The UK’s decision to leave the European Union had thrown GDPR regulation into doubt, as a so-called Brexit would mean the country is no longer part of the EU, and so would not be covered by the ruling - unless it chooses to do so.

The UK Government has indicated it will look to introduce legislation equivalent to GDPR following Brexit - although there has been no official confirmation on exactly what this will be just yet.

For the moment, the EU states that, if you process data about individuals in the context of selling goods or services to citizens in other EU countries then you will need to comply with the GDPR irrespective as to whether or not the UK retains the GDPR post-Brexit.

If your business operations are solely contained to the UK, the position is more unclear, as it will depend on what decision the UK government takes in the coming months.

If you are based outside of the European Union, your business could well still need to comply with GDPR. The EU states that the rules will apply to all companies processing and holding the personal data of data subjects residing in the European Union, regardless of the company’s location.

Is GDPR retrospective?

No - the European Union adopted the two-year transition period in order to provide businesses with the time needed to ensure they are up to speed with GDPR.

GDPR Resources

- EU GDPR website - a central repository for everything you need to know about GDPR

- EU GDPR FAQs - answers to some of the most pressing GDPR questions

- ICO overview of GDPR - guidance for UK businesses on what GDPR is

GDPR: The new European data protection law and its impacts on affiliate marketers

IT Portal from UK - 15 hours 35 min ago

This article is not a legal advice. For accurate consultation on legal matters Admitad strongly recommends readers to speak to a lawyer or visit a legal consultation office which specializes in the GDPR.

We live in a world that is increasingly interconnected as new social media platforms and technologies are released. With so much of our personal data being inputted on the internet, it was only a matter of time before someone used questionable, if not illegal means of obtaining said data. This already happened earlier this year, and Facebook was in the fiery spotlight.

The Cambridge Analytica app asked Facebook users to take a quick survey and then crawled its way into their friends lists, collecting everything from their personal messages to all the info of their contacts. This resulted in 87 million users’ data being leakedand manipulated to fuel Donald Trump’s political campaign.

The Facebook data leak scandal is a perfect example of the reason why we need the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) when it comes to protecting data subjects’ rights. While steps are being taken in the right direction for the individual, there are impacts on businesses and marketers which should be considered. Anyone who does business in Europe or even tangentially collects data from EU Citizens needs to be aware of the GDPR. It affects all industries from e-commerce[3] to horse breeders.

Marketers and advertisers who use affiliate networks also must be aware of the GDPR’s impact on their industry. With this sudden shift in privacy laws, affiliate marketers have their own set of questions that they need answered to properly adapt.

Affiliate marketers adapting to the GDPR

From a purely technical point of view, it is already a mainstream approach to develop pop-up consent tools. When you access the website, within a few seconds a dialogue box will appear which explains the updated privacy rules, and the user has the option to accept or decline the new terms of use.

If a user declines, the website will not be able to use any of their subject data. This is not to be confused with being denied access to the website, as many people don’t read the dialogue boxes and accept them, thinking that they will not be allowed to proceed if they decline.

Adaptations of the ‘data privacy’ term

The European Court now treats data privacy as a sensitive matter. Market players are eagerly awaiting the first appeals of the GDPR for resolving court cases related to personal data. European law is built on the basis of precedents. For marketers to clearly understand the new law and avoid double interpretations, they are waiting for the explanations the European Court will give in respect to the existing terminology, based on judicial practice.

For example, on what grounds will all personal data be divided? How should we treat each type of data? What geographic characteristics should this data have in order to be uniquely suited to the GDPR? These are all questions that the European Court needs to answer to clarify the implementation of the GDPR.

Marketers are also waiting for punishment cases of non-compliance with the GDPR, as they will help to further understand its implications. We see the growth of various GDPR-related businesses which help companies comply with the new law (law advisors, technical help, developers, advocates and lobby). Morgan Lewisis one such law advisor which helps companies adapt. Some networks are joining professional organisations, such as the IAB, to collectively lobby their interests. For example, they officially join its Vendors list, which helps protect business interests and access new measurement initiatives.

In the nearest future, another law will come into effect which deals with aspects concerning working with personal data, and stricter than the GDPR -- the e-Privacy law[4]. Companies and marketers are already preparing for it, lining up their terms of use with its requirements.

How are marketers adapting this term to their practical business processes?

The ecosystem around the GDPR is rapidly changing. The EU's independent data protection authority is called the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS)[1]. One of the responsibilities of the EDPS is to intervene in cases before the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and the General Court.

The EDPS will only intervene in cases that it believes to be relevant to its responsibilities. So far, the EDPS has not brought a case before the CJEU. This means that the EDPS' right to intervene in court cases is not limited to cases where personal data has been processed by European institutions or bodies, but rather extends to all matters affecting the protection of personal data, either on EU or Member State level.

The European judicial system’s multilevel nature makes it quite complicated. For example, the European Court stands above the EU as a whole; however each country has its own court and by-laws detailing certain aspects of the GDPR (general law for the EU) and different interpretations of the law within the framework of individual EU member states. This all needs to be taken into account.

A changing affiliate marketing industry and future predictions

Some companies will shift their business focus from the EU to other parts of the world. The GDPR applies to all market players who somehow collect data about users. Personal data is the main aim of the GDPR, and businesses are uncertain of whether or not they will be able to adapt to the GDPR.

Companies will try to transfer the focus of their business from the EU to other regions of the world such as Japan. This could result in a reduction of their dependence on the European market and risk a smaller share of their business processes. With such strict changes to data collection laws, it’s understandable that some companies would rather move their market than adapt.

Then, the GDPR will help the affiliate marketing industry earn more trust from internet users. Market players who comply with the GDPR will demonstrate more transparency as they treat personal data carefully, and show that their operations related to data collection are legal. Once users begin to place more trust in marketers, it could result in more comfort for consumers who understand that ads are being catered to their true needs, based on information about themselves that they were willing to share.

Finally, every internet subject will be a part of the market change no matter how big said changes will be. For example, under GDPR law, if the company (data controller, Art. 33 of the GDPR) inadvertently allowed the leakage of personal data of EU citizens, it is obliged to notify the personal data breach to the supervisory authority in accordance with Article 55[3] within 72 hours.

None of the previous laws had this requirement, and it will diversify the corporate approach of all market players towards personal data, including changes in their business processes or even business structures.

The impacts of the GDPR on how affiliate marketing networks operate

In affiliate marketing, as well as generally on the internet, all participants are linked and interdependent. In essence, this means that the internet is the global network. There are no state borders on the internet, which can be physically experienced offline.

It's hard to track how the personal data was leaked on the Internet. There are many legal and illegal ways to retrieve personal data. In this regard, according to the GDPR, participants in the affiliate marketing process can play various roles. They can be either a data controller or a data processor, and be responsible for the violations prescribed by the GDPR in accordance with the specific role. Everyone who, depending on the role, has not taken appropriate action, will be responsible for the consequences detailed by the GDPR.

The EU legal authorities understand the difficulties of the public. The European Court of Justice (ECJ) recently shed light on who is a ‘Data Controller’ Under GDPR. The ECJ rendered a judgmenton July 10 that explains, amongst other things, what a (joint) data controller is. The judgment is on the “old” EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC[2], but the provisions in the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Art. 4 and 26, are very similar.

Some practical consequences include:

  • The status of a (joint) controller does not require that the controller have data access;
  • Written guidelines or instructions from the controller on the purpose and means of processing are not required;
  • Manual records/notes are also covered by the GDPR;
  • The level of ‘control’ of the controller “in determining the purposes and means of processing of personal data” is the decisive factor;
  • The judgment will probably lead to a more intense discussion as to who is a (joint) controller;
  • One decisive factor will be to determine who “organised, coordinated and encouraged” the data processing;

The terms ‘data controller’ and ‘data processor’ among the European community and business are still being defined. Everyone needs to get a clear explanation of many sides and details of the new law.

This is where the chaotic nature of the changes in the EU digital market emerges. Big players are trying to decide which role they will play according to the GDPR. Are they a data controller, or a data processor?  A new trend called “self-determination” has marketers selecting one role instead of another, because they consider that if they choose one specific role, it will bring less responsibility and risk. Yet, no one knows for sure. The current understanding of the GDPR among the affiliate marketers is still very vague.

Given the recent enactment of the GDPR, affiliate marketers and lawyers alike are awaiting the first round of legal cases that appeal concepts of the GDPR in relation to personal data collection and use. Everyone is patiently anticipating the explanations which will come from the European Court, when it comes to the existing terminology. Some of the questions include how the law will outline the division of personal data, how the types will be separated, and so on.

Furthermore, there are new businesses and positions being set up to help with issues relating to the GDPR. Affiliate marketers and other businesses are eyeing another new law coming to light in the EU -- the e-Privacy law -- which is considered more strict than GDPR. 

Alexander Bachmann, CEO and founder, Admitad
Image source: Shutterstock/Wright Studio

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-6 Additional information for APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-3 tvOS 12

Security Updates from SECLISTS - 17 hours 7 min ago

Posted by Apple Product Security on Sep 24

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-6 Additional information for
APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-3 tvOS 12

tvOS 12 addresses the following:

Auto Unlock
Available for: Apple TV 4K and Apple TV (4th generation)
Impact: A malicious application may be able to access local users
AppleIDs
Description: A validation issue existed in the entitlement
verification. This issue was addressed with improved validation of
the process entitlement.
CVE-2018-4321: Min (Spark) Zheng, Xiaolong...

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-5 Additional information for APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-2 watchOS 5

Security Updates from SECLISTS - 17 hours 9 min ago

Posted by Apple Product Security on Sep 24

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-5 Additional information for
APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-2 watchOS 5

watchOS 5 addresses the following:

iTunes Store
Available for: Apple Watch Series 1 and later
Impact: An attacker in a privileged network position may be able to
spoof password prompts in the iTunes Store
Description: An input validation issue was addressed with improved
input validation.
CVE-2018-4305: Jerry Decime

Kernel
Available for: Apple Watch Series 1 and...

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-4 Additional information for APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-1 iOS 12

Security Updates from SECLISTS - 17 hours 9 min ago

Posted by Apple Product Security on Sep 24

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-4 Additional information for
APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-1 iOS 12

iOS 12 addresses the following:

Accounts
Available for: iPhone 5s and later, iPad Air and later, and iPod
touch 6th generation
Impact: A local app may be able to read a persistent account
identifier
Description: This issue was addressed with improved entitlements.
CVE-2018-4322: Min (Spark) Zheng, Xiaolong Bai of Alibaba Inc.

Auto Unlock
Available for: iPhone 5s and...

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-2 iTunes 12.9 for Windows

Security Updates from SECLISTS - 17 hours 13 min ago

Posted by Apple Product Security on Sep 24

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-2 iTunes 12.9 for Windows

iTunes 12.9 for Windows addresses the following:

WebKit
Available for: Windows 7 and later
Impact: Unexpected interaction causes an ASSERT failure
Description: A memory corruption issue was addressed with improved
validation.
CVE-2018-4191: found by OSS-Fuzz

WebKit
Available for: Windows 7 and later
Impact: Cross-origin SecurityErrors includes the accessed frame's
origin
Description: The issue...

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-3 Additional information for APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-4 Safari 12

Security Updates from SECLISTS - 17 hours 17 min ago

Posted by Apple Product Security on Sep 24

APPLE-SA-2018-9-24-3 Additional information for
APPLE-SA-2018-9-17-4 Safari 12

Safari 12 addresses the following:

Safari
Available for: macOS Sierra 10.12.6, macOS High Sierra 10.13.6, macOS
Mojave 10.14
Impact: A user may be unable to delete browsing history items
Description: Clearing a history item may not clear visits with
redirect chains. The issue was addressed with improved data deletion.
CVE-2018-4329: Hugo S. Diaz (coldpointblue)...

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